Three myths about dishonest behaviour

Reports of problems with turnstiles keep on coming. You, Compliance Officer of a large company, with facilities in several states in Brazil, don’t know what to do anymore.

In recent months, the Audit team identified that a large number of employees had the habit of circumventing the company’s clock in and out system in order to clock in a little later and leave a little earlier. A considerable loss for the organization, which required a quick response from the Compliance area.

The problem seemed clear to solve: the system of controls needed to be modernized and improved, and the employees be trained again. After all, it was easy to bypass the “old system”.

Two months later, it was time to find out whether the changes had the expected effect. The Compliance team was confident about the new compliance measures implemented. After all, the new Compliance training had been well attended, and all the turnstiles had been replaced by a much more modern fingerprint identification system.

Everything went right! The data indicated that the employees were no longer cheating the system. The problem was solved. Everyone was satisfied.

Sometime later, however, there were new rumors that some employees had started using silicone molds, the kind that can easily be purchased on the internet, to clock in for their colleagues. After a brief investigation, it was found that some employees were doing this to bypass the system.

The response from the Compliance team was not long in coming: cameras were installed, employees were fired, new training sessions were held, and awareness campaigns were conducted. Would not be the case to install an even more modern system, such as facial recognition?

We have finally come to the present day. One’s perplexity makes sense: you did everything that the traditional manuals, your intuition and logic indicated, but things didn’t turn out the way you expected. You did everything “right”, and yet things “went wrong”.

Why did it happen?

The answer lies in the fact that often our intuitions about how people make decisions is unrealistic. As much as we may not realize it, we tend to think of compliance measures that will work for a very specific type of people. More controls and more information would be appropriate measures if, and only if, their subjects were strongly rational people with an unlimited capacity to pay attention and assimilate information, and always needed external incentives to act honestly.

But how do people really behave?

We all can imagine one or another very rational person who makes decisions in a “cold and calculating” way. However, when we look around to the great majority of people, it becomes clear that these “cold and calculating” people are the exception. The reality is that (and this is a fundamental point to think about regarding the effectiveness of compliance measures) most people are emotional and easily distracted, especially when they take complex decisions in a context of haste and pressure typical of the organisations.

Next, we will present three myths about dishonest behaviour that arise because we use the exception as if it were the rule, a minority as if it were the majority. Our objective is not to give an in-depth explanation, as in the book MUITOS[1], rather just to present them.

Understanding the existence of these myths may be the key for us to first diagnose the reasons why many compliance measures do not work, and finally to think about what we can do to make them more effective.

MYTH 1: “Crime pays”

Every time we think about making interventions to change behaviour, even without stopping to reflect on it, we adopt a set of assumptions about how their subjects make decisions.

We can, for example, begin by assuming that people take reciprocity very much into account, or perhaps that they are very influenced by what they think others are doing. The idea is that we will always create interventions that are adapted and appropriate for the kind of people we have in mind.

It so happens that, in general, we tend to think of a very particular type of person when developing our compliance measures. More than being social, reciprocal beings, among so many other possibilities, we assume that people are moved, almost exclusively, by calculations of pros and cons, that is, that they will opt for the most advantageous alternative in each situation.

And why do we think like that?

It is important to realize that our perceptions result from a combination of what we learn in books and courses with our intuitions and life experiences.

If we look closely, books and manuals in several areas of the Social Sciences, such as Law or Administration, are strongly influenced by the assumptions of the Rational Choice Theory. Under this perspective, people possess full rationality, have complete, transitive and continuous preferences, among other characteristics that we typically associate with “cold and calculating” decision making.

It so happens that Rational Choice Theory is not, and has never intended to be, a descriptive theory about how people make decisions. It is, in fact, a set of assumptions that aims to simplify reality and allow the construction of predictive models in many different areas. Rational Choice Theory, therefore, serves more as a benchmark of how we would make decisions if we were rational agents, something useful for thinking about public and organizational policies in some contexts, but not as a descriptive theory of how people actually make decisions.

As if the strong influence of the Rational Choice Theory in academic circles was not enough, the perception that people make decisions in a “cold and calculating” way also receives support in the common sense, in the way we intuitively explain other people’s actions.

In our hypothetical example, if we think, for instance, about why people have bypassed the turnstiles, we can easily think of incentive-related reasons (e.g., the person is not afraid of being caught or of the size of the punishment itself if caught) and we hardly think of issues outside this area (e.g., the subject may feel that this is something common and acceptable in that context, or feel that this is a fair compensation for some injustice he/she has suffered from his/her employers).

What can we do, then?

The first point is to understand that, although we know some homo economic out there, and that all of us may reason this way from time to time, in reality this is not a realistic way to describe human behaviour.

What the Behavioural Sciences show us is a very different scenario: first, we are not always rational, predictable, or act selfishly; second, there are factors other than typically economic issues that influence decision making, namely cognitive issues (our heuristics and biases), social issues (the influence of social norms), and contextual issues (influences of small changes in the decision-making architecture).

MYTH 2: “It’s the bad apples that are the problem”

We often hear that there are honest and dishonest people, and that integrity problems will be solved if we can identify and neutralize dishonest people.

Is it really the case?

No. The problem is not the few “bad apples”, but the vast majority of ordinary people, like you and me, who consider themselves to be honest but commit ethical irregularities all the time.

Let’s remember our hypothetical case of people bypassing the turnstiles: Try to imagine that you are in front of the footage at the exact moment a person is using a silicone finger to bypass the system. The person looks to one side and to the other, uses the fake finger, and with a “straight face” proceeds to his workstation. It’s hard to contain our bewilderment or feeling of anger: “How can someone has such a bad character like that?”

As of that wasn’t enough, hours later, this same person posts on his social networks that he is against corruption and writes about the importance of teaching his children ethical values. We therefore think: “It has to be a crazy person, maybe a psychopath or a serial killer in disguise.” Probably none of these options. 

The great contribution of the Behavioural Sciences to the psychology of dishonesty is to realize that people manage to reconcile what should be irreconcilable: acting dishonestly and perceiving oneself as an honest person. This is possible, in general, for two reasons: (i) the ethical blind spots, it means, the contexts in which we perform ethical deviations without being able to identify the moral dilemma of our action; and (ii) the mechanisms of rationalization which we use to justify our actions.

Therefore, although we may think that this is a dishonest person – that knows it and doesn’t care about it – it is most likely a person who considers himself to be honest, but who (i) either doesn’t realize that he has done something reprehensible or (ii) realizes that he has done something reprehensible, but has used his creativity to lessen his psychological discomfort and sense of guilt.

The important point here is that, with few exceptions such as people on the psychopathic spectrum, we all consider ourselves to be honest – yes, even that corrupt politician on the front page of the newspapers. And, perhaps the most important point, considering oneself to be honest is no guarantee that people will stop committing ethical deviations.

The truth is that, because of ethical blind spots and mechanisms of rationalization – not to mention our enormous difficulty in identifying our own mistakes – we, the “Many” of the book MUITOS, can always be the “bad apple” in other people’s eyes.

MYTH 3: “The more controls, the better”.

We find it very difficult to perceive the side effects of creating excessive controls on people’s motivation.

The compliance professional is often faced with a dilemma: on the one hand, he or she needs to implement sufficiently strict controls to prevent all kinds of deviations; on the other hand, he or she knows that the implementation of these controls has a negative impact on employee well-being and motivation. 

It doesn’t have to be that way.

Behavioral Sciences shows us that this is a false dilemma. The compliance professional doesn’t have to make a tough choice between the “lesser of two evils”, but rather reconcile the best of both worlds: create controls tough enough to deter a minority of ill-intentioned characters, but in a way that doesn’t undermine the satisfaction, nor diminish the motivation of the vast majority of people, who already intended, naturally, to act in the right way.

To understand this point, we need to understand why controls cause so many problems. The first step is to identify that there are different types of motivation and to understand how they interact.

People have, therefore, two types of motivation. In general, they can be motivated to perform some activity geared toward a motivation that is more autonomous, which comes “from within” – the so-called intrinsic motivation; or geared toward a more controlled type of motivation, which comes “from the outside” – the so-called extrinsic motivation.

We are usually autonomously (or intrinsically) motivated to perform activities we find interesting or important, such as, for example, learning a new instrument – or acting honestly in everyday life. It means, we are motivated to perform the action regardless of whether there is an economic or reputational incentive.

On the other hand, for activities that we don’t find interesting or relevant, we need something different to motivate us. In these cases, we need extrinsic incentives, such as the possibility of a fine, a reward, or the threat of punishment, to become – and stay – motivated to perform the activity. 

The problem arises when we mix the two types of motivation. When we add extrinsic incentives (e.g., a control) to activities that people already perform autonomously because they are intrinsically motivated.

In this case, intuitively, we can think that it is a perfect combination. After all, people now have double the motivation they had before to perform the activity: intrinsic motivation (which they have always had) plus extrinsic motivation (promoted by external incentives).

However, this is not quite how it happens in practice. The evidence from Behavioural Sciences shows us that the addition of external incentives may not only harm people’s performance – the phenomenon known to economists as crowding-out of intrinsic motivation – but also their satisfaction and well-being in the medium and long term – the phenomenon known to psychologists as the undermining effect. In addition, there is the perverse effect of creating the dependence of people’s performance connected to the maintenance of incentives.

Why does this happen?

The problem arises because the two types of motivation do not go well together. Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, instead of adding up, or just coexisting, may end up cancelling each other out.

What we can observe is that the addition of external incentives ends up corrupting the way a person perceives the activity. In the case of compliance controls aimed to dissuade ethical deviations, the risk is that the receiver of the control begins to perceive the issues related to ethics (something non-negotiable in his private life as a matter of principle) as a business or economic issue, something subject to a pros and cons examination.

Therefore, the challenge for the compliance professional, in reality, is not in choosing between more controls or more motivation, but in the way to reconcile both. That is, to create controls that are strict, but that do not generate so many side effects on the motivation and well-being of their recipients.

It can be done! And the way is to adjust control measures to people’s so-called Basic Psychological Needs for Autonomy, Competence and Connection. A talk for a future article.

Os reportes de problemas com as catracas não param de chegar. Você, Compliance Officer de uma grande empresa, com instalações em diversos estados no Brasil, não sabe mais o que fazer.

Nos últimos meses, a equipe de Auditoria identificou que grande parte dos colaboradores tinha o hábito de burlar o sistema de pontos de entrada e saída, para entrar um pouco mais tarde e sair um pouco mais cedo da empresa. Um prejuízo considerável para a organização, que demandava uma resposta rápida da área de Compliance.

O problema parecia claro de resolver: era preciso modernizar e aprimorar o sistema de controles e dar mais treinamentos. Afinal, era fácil burlar o “velho sistema”.

Dois meses depois, era a hora de descobrir se as mudanças tiveram o efeito esperado. A equipe de Compliance estava confiante com o trabalho realizado. Afinal, foram muitos acessos ao novo treinamento de Compliance e praticamente todas as catracas foram substituídas por um sistema de identificação por meio de digitais, muito mais moderno.

Deu tudo certo! Os dados apontavam que os colaboradores não mais burlavam o sistema. O problema estava resolvido. Todos ficaram satisfeitos.

Entretanto, um tempo depois, surgiram novos rumores de que alguns colaboradores começaram a utilizar moldes de silicone, daqueles que podem ser comprados facilmente pela internet, para fazer a marcação de pontos dos colegas. Após uma breve investigação, constatou-se que parte dos colaboradores estava utilizando essa forma de burlar o sistema.

A resposta da equipe de Compliance não tardou: câmeras foram instaladas, funcionários demitidos, novos treinamentos realizados e campanhas de conscientização foram realizadas. Será que não seria o caso de instalar um sistema ainda mais moderno, como o de reconhecimento facial?

Chegamos finalmente ao dia de hoje. Sua perplexidade tem sentido: você fez tudo o que os manuais tradicionais, a sua intuição e a lógica indicavam, mas as coisas não saíram da forma esperada. Você fez tudo “certo”, mas, ainda assim, as coisas “deram errado”.

Por que será que isso ocorreu?

A resposta está no fato de que, muitas vezes, as nossas intuições sobre como as pessoas tomam decisões é pouco realista. Por mais que não percebamos, tendemos a pensar em medidas de compliance que vão funcionar para um tipo muito específico de pessoas. Mais controles e mais informações seriam as medidas adequadas se, e somente se, os seus destinatários fossem pessoas fortemente racionais, com uma capacidade ilimitada de prestar atenção e de assimilar informações, e que precisam sempre de incentivos externos para agir de forma honesta.

Mas como as pessoas realmente se comportam?

Todos nós conseguimos imaginar uma ou outra pessoa muito racional, que toma decisões de forma “fria e calculista”. Porém, quando olhamos para os lados, para a grande maioria das pessoas, fica claro que tais pessoas “frias e calculistas” são a exceção. A realidade é que (e esse é um ponto fundamental para pensarmos na efetividade das medidas de compliance) a maioria das pessoas é emocional e facilmente distraída, especialmente quando tomam decisões complexas em um contexto de pressa e pressão típico das organizações.

A seguir, vamos apresentar três mitos sobre o comportamento desonesto que surgem em razão do fato de utilizarmos como referência a exceção como se fosse a regra, uma minoria como se fosse a maioria. Nosso objetivo não é o de fazer uma explicação aprofundada, tal como no livro Muitos, mas apenas apresentá-los.

Entender a existência desses mitos pode ser a chave para que possamos, primeiro, diagnosticar as razões pelas quais muitas medidas de compliance não funcionam e, finalmente, pensarmos no que podemos fazer para torná-las mais efetivas.

MITO 1: “O crime compensa”

Toda a vez que pensamos em fazer intervenções para mudar comportamentos, ainda que sem parar para refletir sobre isso, adotamos um conjunto de pressupostos sobre como os destinatários das nossas intervenções tomam decisões.

Podemos, por exemplo, partir do pressuposto de que as pessoas levam muito em conta a reciprocidade, ou, talvez, que são muito influenciadas pelo que acham que os outros estão fazendo. A ideia é que vamos sempre criar intervenções adaptadas e adequadas para o tipo de pessoas que temos em mente.

Ocorre que, em geral, tendemos a pensar em um tipo de pessoa muito particular ao desenvolvermos as nossas medidas de compliance. Mais do que seres sociais, recíprocos, entre outras tantas possibilidades, assumimos que as pessoas são movidas, quase que exclusivamente, por cálculos de prós e contras, ou seja, que vão optar pela alternativa mais vantajosa em cada situação.

E por que pensamos assim e não de outra forma?

Aqui é importante perceber que as nossas percepções são fruto de uma combinação do que aprendemos em livros e cursos com as nossas intuições e experiências de vida.

Se repararmos com atenção, livros e manuais de diversas áreas das Ciências Sociais, como o Direito ou a Administração, são fortemente influenciados pelos pressupostos da Teoria da Escolha Racional. Por esta perspectiva, as pessoas possuem racionalidade plena, têm preferências completas, transitivas e contínuas, entre outras características que tipicamente associamos à tomada de decisão “fria e calculista”.

Ocorre que a Teoria da Escolha Racional não é, nem nunca pretendeu ser, uma teoria descritiva sobre como as pessoas tomam decisões. Trata-se, na verdade, de um conjunto de pressupostos que tem por objetivo simplificar a realidade e permitir a construção de modelos preditivos nas mais diversas áreas. A Teoria da Escolha Racional, portanto, serve mais como um benchmark sobre como tomaríamos decisões caso fossemos agentes racionais, algo útil para pensarmos em políticas públicas e organizacionais em alguns contextos, mas não como uma teoria descritiva sobre como as pessoas, de fato, tomam decisões.

Não bastasse a forte influência da Teoria da Escolha Racional nos meios acadêmicos, a percepção de que as pessoas tomam decisões de forma “fria e calculista” também tem respaldo no senso comum, na forma como, intuitivamente, explicamos as ações das outras pessoas.

No nosso exemplo hipotético, se pensarmos, por exemplo, na razão das pessoas terem burlado as catracas, facilmente conseguimos pensar em razões ligadas a incentivos (ex.: a pessoa não tem medo de ser pega ou do tamanho da punição, caso seja pega) e dificilmente pensamos em questões fora desta dimensão (ex.: ela pode achar que se trata de algo comum e aceitável naquele contexto ou sente que se trata de uma contrapartida justa por alguma injustiça que sofreu dos seus empregadores).

O que podemos fazer, então?

O primeiro ponto é entender que, a despeito de conhecermos alguns homo economici por aí, e que todos nós possamos raciocinar desta forma de vez em quando, na realidade, esta não é uma forma realista de descrever o comportamento humano.

O que as Ciências Comportamentais nos mostram é um cenário bem diferente: primeiro, nem sempre somos racionais, previsíveis ou agimos de forma egoísta; segundo, há outros fatores além das questões tipicamente econômicas que influenciam a tomada de decisão, nomeadamente, as questões cognitivas (nossas heurísticas e vieses), as questões sociais (a influência das normas sociais) e as questões contextuais (influências de pequenas alterações na arquitetura da tomada de decisão ou os nudges).

 MITO 2: “O problema são as maçãs podres”

É comum ouvirmos que existem pessoas honestas e desonestas, e que os problemas de integridade serão resolvidos se conseguirmos identificar e neutralizar as pessoas desonestas.

Será que é assim mesmo?

Não. O problema não são algumas poucas “maçãs podres”, mas a grande maioria das pessoas comuns, como eu e você, que se consideram honestas, mas que cometem desvios éticos o tempo todo. 

Vamos relembrar o nosso caso hipotético das pessoas burlando as catracas: Tente imaginar que você está diante da filmagem do momento exato em que uma pessoa está utilizando um dedo de silicone para enganar o sistema. A pessoa olha para um lado e para o outro, utiliza o dedo fake e, com a maior “cara lavada”, segue para o seu posto de trabalho. Difícil conter a nossa perplexidade ou um sentimento de raiva: “Como uma pessoa pode ser tão mal-caráter assim?”

Não bastasse isso, horas depois, essa mesma pessoa posta em suas redes sociais que é contra a corrupção ou escreve algo sobre a importância de ensinar aos seus filhos os valores éticos. Então pensamos: “Só pode ser uma pessoa louca, talvez um psicopata ou um serial killer disfarçado”. Provavelmente nenhuma dessas opções. 

A grande contribuição das Ciências Comportamentais para a psicologia da desonestidade é perceber que as pessoas conseguem conciliar o que deveria ser inconciliável: agir de forma desonesta e se perceber como uma pessoa honesta. Isso é possível, de forma geral, por duas razões[1]: (i) os pontos cegos éticos, ou seja, os contextos em que realizamos desvios éticos sem que possamos identificar o dilema moral da nossa ação; e (ii) os mecanismos de racionalização, que utilizamos para atenuar as nossas ações.

Assim, apesar de pensarmos que se trata de uma pessoa desonesta — e que sabe e não liga para isso —, o mais provável é que se trate de uma pessoa que se considera honesta, mas que (i) ou não percebeu que fez algo reprovável ou que (ii) percebeu que fez algo reprovável, mas utilizou a sua criatividade para diminuir o seu mal-estar psicológico e o seu sentimento de culpa.

O ponto importante aqui é que, salvo raras exceções, como casos das pessoas no espectro da psicopatia, todos nós nos consideramos honestos — sim, mesmo aquele político corrupto que estampa as capas de jornais —, e que, talvez o ponto mais importante: considerar-se honesto não é garantia para que as pessoas deixem de cometer desvios éticos.

A verdade é que, em razão dos pontos cegos éticos e dos mecanismos de racionalização — sem contar com a nossa enorme dificuldade de identificar nossos próprios erros —, nós, os “Muitos” do livro Muitos, sempre poderemos ser a “maçã podre” aos olhos das outras pessoas.

  MITO 3: “Quanto mais controles, melhor”

Temos muita dificuldade de perceber os efeitos colaterais da criação excessiva de controles sobre a motivação das pessoas.

O profissional de Compliance se encontra, muitas vezes, diante de um dilema: por um lado, precisa implementar controles suficientemente rígidos para evitar todo o tipo de desvios; por outro lado, sabe que a implementação desses controles têm impacto negativo sobre o bem-estar e a motivação dos colaboradores. 

Não precisa ser assim.

As Ciências Comportamentais nos mostram que este é um falso dilema. O profissional de Compliance não precisa fazer uma escolha dura entre o “menos pior” dos dois males, mas conciliar o melhor dos dois mundos: criar controles duros o suficiente para dissuadir uma minoria de mal-intencionados, mas de uma maneira que não prejudique a satisfação, nem diminua a motivação da grande maioria das pessoas, que já pretendia, naturalmente, agir de forma correta.

Para entender este ponto, precisamos compreender o porquê de os controles causarem tantos problemas. O primeiro passo é identificarmos que existem diferentes tipos de motivação e entendermos como ocorre a interação entre elas.

As pessoas possuem, portanto, dois tipos de motivação. De maneira geral, podem ficar motivadas para realizar alguma atividade por um tipo de motivação de natureza mais autônoma, que vem “de dentro” — a chamada motivação intrínseca; ou por um tipo de motivação de natureza mais controlada, que vem “de fora” – a chamada motivação extrínseca.

Geralmente, estamos autonomamente (ou intrinsecamente) motivados para realizar atividades que consideramos interessantes ou importantes, como, por exemplo, aprender um novo instrumento — ou agirmos de forma honesta no dia a dia. Isto é, temos a motivação para realizar a ação independentemente da existência de algum incentivo econômico ou reputacional.

Por outro lado, para as atividades que não consideramos interessantes ou relevantes é necessário algo diferente para nos motivar. Nestes casos, precisamos de incentivos extrínsecos, como a previsão de uma multa, de um prêmio ou uma ameaça de punição, para ficarmos — e permanecermos — motivados para realizar a atividade. 

O problema surge quando misturamos os dois tipos de motivação. Isto é, quando adicionamos incentivos extrínsecos (ex.: um controle), para atividades que as pessoas já realizam de forma autônoma, por estarem intrinsecamente motivadas.

Neste caso, de forma intuitiva, podemos pensar que se trata de uma combinação perfeita. Afinal, agora as pessoas têm o dobro de motivação que tinham antes para realizar a atividade: a motivação intrínseca (que sempre tiveram) mais a motivação extrínseca (promovida pelos incentivos externos).

Porém, não é bem assim que ocorre na prática. As evidências das Ciências Comportamentais nos mostram que a adição de incentivos externos pode não só prejudicar a performance das pessoas — fenômeno conhecido pelos economistas como crowding-out da motivação intrínseca —, como também a sua satisfação e o seu bem-estar no médio e longo prazo — fenômeno conhecido por psicólogos como undermining effect. Além do efeito perverso de criar a dependência da performance das pessoas à manutenção dos incentivos.

Por que isso ocorre?

O problema surge porque os dois tipos de motivação não combinam muito bem entre si. Motivação intrínseca e extrínseca, em vez de somarem, ou apenas coexistirem, podem acabar por se anularem mutuamente.

O que podemos observar é que a adição de incentivos externos acaba por corromper a forma como a pessoa percebe a atividade. No caso dos controles de compliance para dissuadir os desvios éticos, o risco é o de que o destinatário do controle comece a perceber as questões ligadas à ética (algo inegociável na sua vida particular por uma questão de princípios) como uma questão de business ou econômica, algo passível de um exame de prós e contras.

Portanto, o desafio do profissional do Compliance, na realidade, não precisa ser na escolha entre mais controles ou mais motivação, mas uma forma de conciliar ambos. Isto é, criar controles rígidos, mas que não gerem tantos efeitos colaterais sobre a motivação e o bem-estar dos seus destinatários.

Dá para fazer! E o caminho passa por ajustar as medidas de controle às chamadas Necessidades Básicas Psicológicas das pessoas por Autonomia, Competência e Conexão. Um papo para um próximo artigo.

*******

[1] No livro Muitos, os autores tratam estes dois tópicos de maneira aprofundada.

Os reportes de problemas com as catracas não param de chegar. Você, Compliance Officer de uma grande empresa, com instalações em diversos estados no Brasil, não sabe mais o que fazer.

Nos últimos meses, a equipe de Auditoria identificou que grande parte dos colaboradores tinha o hábito de burlar o sistema de pontos de entrada e saída, para entrar um pouco mais tarde e sair um pouco mais cedo da empresa. Um prejuízo considerável para a organização, que demandava uma resposta rápida da área de Compliance.

O problema parecia claro de resolver: era preciso modernizar e aprimorar o sistema de controles e dar mais treinamentos. Afinal, era fácil burlar o “velho sistema”.

Dois meses depois, era a hora de descobrir se as mudanças tiveram o efeito esperado. A equipe de Compliance estava confiante com o trabalho realizado. Afinal, foram muitos acessos ao novo treinamento de Compliance e praticamente todas as catracas foram substituídas por um sistema de identificação por meio de digitais, muito mais moderno.

Deu tudo certo! Os dados apontavam que os colaboradores não mais burlavam o sistema. O problema estava resolvido. Todos ficaram satisfeitos.

Entretanto, um tempo depois, surgiram novos rumores de que alguns colaboradores começaram a utilizar moldes de silicone, daqueles que podem ser comprados facilmente pela internet, para fazer a marcação de pontos dos colegas. Após uma breve investigação, constatou-se que parte dos colaboradores estava utilizando essa forma de burlar o sistema.

A resposta da equipe de Compliance não tardou: câmeras foram instaladas, funcionários demitidos, novos treinamentos realizados e campanhas de conscientização foram realizadas. Será que não seria o caso de instalar um sistema ainda mais moderno, como o de reconhecimento facial?

Chegamos finalmente ao dia de hoje. Sua perplexidade tem sentido: você fez tudo o que os manuais tradicionais, a sua intuição e a lógica indicavam, mas as coisas não saíram da forma esperada. Você fez tudo “certo”, mas, ainda assim, as coisas “deram errado”.

Por que será que isso ocorreu?

A resposta está no fato de que, muitas vezes, as nossas intuições sobre como as pessoas tomam decisões é pouco realista. Por mais que não percebamos, tendemos a pensar em medidas de compliance que vão funcionar para um tipo muito específico de pessoas. Mais controles e mais informações seriam as medidas adequadas se, e somente se, os seus destinatários fossem pessoas fortemente racionais, com uma capacidade ilimitada de prestar atenção e de assimilar informações, e que precisam sempre de incentivos externos para agir de forma honesta.

Mas como as pessoas realmente se comportam?

Todos nós conseguimos imaginar uma ou outra pessoa muito racional, que toma decisões de forma “fria e calculista”. Porém, quando olhamos para os lados, para a grande maioria das pessoas, fica claro que tais pessoas “frias e calculistas” são a exceção. A realidade é que (e esse é um ponto fundamental para pensarmos na efetividade das medidas de compliance) a maioria das pessoas é emocional e facilmente distraída, especialmente quando tomam decisões complexas em um contexto de pressa e pressão típico das organizações.

A seguir, vamos apresentar três mitos sobre o comportamento desonesto que surgem em razão do fato de utilizarmos como referência a exceção como se fosse a regra, uma minoria como se fosse a maioria. Nosso objetivo não é o de fazer uma explicação aprofundada, tal como no livro Muitos, mas apenas apresentá-los.

Entender a existência desses mitos pode ser a chave para que possamos, primeiro, diagnosticar as razões pelas quais muitas medidas de compliance não funcionam e, finalmente, pensarmos no que podemos fazer para torná-las mais efetivas.

MITO 1: “O crime compensa”

Toda a vez que pensamos em fazer intervenções para mudar comportamentos, ainda que sem parar para refletir sobre isso, adotamos um conjunto de pressupostos sobre como os destinatários das nossas intervenções tomam decisões.

Podemos, por exemplo, partir do pressuposto de que as pessoas levam muito em conta a reciprocidade, ou, talvez, que são muito influenciadas pelo que acham que os outros estão fazendo. A ideia é que vamos sempre criar intervenções adaptadas e adequadas para o tipo de pessoas que temos em mente.

Ocorre que, em geral, tendemos a pensar em um tipo de pessoa muito particular ao desenvolvermos as nossas medidas de compliance. Mais do que seres sociais, recíprocos, entre outras tantas possibilidades, assumimos que as pessoas são movidas, quase que exclusivamente, por cálculos de prós e contras, ou seja, que vão optar pela alternativa mais vantajosa em cada situação.

E por que pensamos assim e não de outra forma?

Aqui é importante perceber que as nossas percepções são fruto de uma combinação do que aprendemos em livros e cursos com as nossas intuições e experiências de vida.

Se repararmos com atenção, livros e manuais de diversas áreas das Ciências Sociais, como o Direito ou a Administração, são fortemente influenciados pelos pressupostos da Teoria da Escolha Racional. Por esta perspectiva, as pessoas possuem racionalidade plena, têm preferências completas, transitivas e contínuas, entre outras características que tipicamente associamos à tomada de decisão “fria e calculista”.

Ocorre que a Teoria da Escolha Racional não é, nem nunca pretendeu ser, uma teoria descritiva sobre como as pessoas tomam decisões. Trata-se, na verdade, de um conjunto de pressupostos que tem por objetivo simplificar a realidade e permitir a construção de modelos preditivos nas mais diversas áreas. A Teoria da Escolha Racional, portanto, serve mais como um benchmark sobre como tomaríamos decisões caso fossemos agentes racionais, algo útil para pensarmos em políticas públicas e organizacionais em alguns contextos, mas não como uma teoria descritiva sobre como as pessoas, de fato, tomam decisões.

Não bastasse a forte influência da Teoria da Escolha Racional nos meios acadêmicos, a percepção de que as pessoas tomam decisões de forma “fria e calculista” também tem respaldo no senso comum, na forma como, intuitivamente, explicamos as ações das outras pessoas.

No nosso exemplo hipotético, se pensarmos, por exemplo, na razão das pessoas terem burlado as catracas, facilmente conseguimos pensar em razões ligadas a incentivos (ex.: a pessoa não tem medo de ser pega ou do tamanho da punição, caso seja pega) e dificilmente pensamos em questões fora desta dimensão (ex.: ela pode achar que se trata de algo comum e aceitável naquele contexto ou sente que se trata de uma contrapartida justa por alguma injustiça que sofreu dos seus empregadores).

O que podemos fazer, então?

O primeiro ponto é entender que, a despeito de conhecermos alguns homo economici por aí, e que todos nós possamos raciocinar desta forma de vez em quando, na realidade, esta não é uma forma realista de descrever o comportamento humano.

O que as Ciências Comportamentais nos mostram é um cenário bem diferente: primeiro, nem sempre somos racionais, previsíveis ou agimos de forma egoísta; segundo, há outros fatores além das questões tipicamente econômicas que influenciam a tomada de decisão, nomeadamente, as questões cognitivas (nossas heurísticas e vieses), as questões sociais (a influência das normas sociais) e as questões contextuais (influências de pequenas alterações na arquitetura da tomada de decisão ou os nudges).

 MITO 2: “O problema são as maçãs podres”

É comum ouvirmos que existem pessoas honestas e desonestas, e que os problemas de integridade serão resolvidos se conseguirmos identificar e neutralizar as pessoas desonestas.

Será que é assim mesmo?

Não. O problema não são algumas poucas “maçãs podres”, mas a grande maioria das pessoas comuns, como eu e você, que se consideram honestas, mas que cometem desvios éticos o tempo todo. 

Vamos relembrar o nosso caso hipotético das pessoas burlando as catracas: Tente imaginar que você está diante da filmagem do momento exato em que uma pessoa está utilizando um dedo de silicone para enganar o sistema. A pessoa olha para um lado e para o outro, utiliza o dedo fake e, com a maior “cara lavada”, segue para o seu posto de trabalho. Difícil conter a nossa perplexidade ou um sentimento de raiva: “Como uma pessoa pode ser tão mal-caráter assim?”

Não bastasse isso, horas depois, essa mesma pessoa posta em suas redes sociais que é contra a corrupção ou escreve algo sobre a importância de ensinar aos seus filhos os valores éticos. Então pensamos: “Só pode ser uma pessoa louca, talvez um psicopata ou um serial killer disfarçado”. Provavelmente nenhuma dessas opções. 

A grande contribuição das Ciências Comportamentais para a psicologia da desonestidade é perceber que as pessoas conseguem conciliar o que deveria ser inconciliável: agir de forma desonesta e se perceber como uma pessoa honesta. Isso é possível, de forma geral, por duas razões[1]: (i) os pontos cegos éticos, ou seja, os contextos em que realizamos desvios éticos sem que possamos identificar o dilema moral da nossa ação; e (ii) os mecanismos de racionalização, que utilizamos para atenuar as nossas ações.

Assim, apesar de pensarmos que se trata de uma pessoa desonesta — e que sabe e não liga para isso —, o mais provável é que se trate de uma pessoa que se considera honesta, mas que (i) ou não percebeu que fez algo reprovável ou que (ii) percebeu que fez algo reprovável, mas utilizou a sua criatividade para diminuir o seu mal-estar psicológico e o seu sentimento de culpa.

O ponto importante aqui é que, salvo raras exceções, como casos das pessoas no espectro da psicopatia, todos nós nos consideramos honestos — sim, mesmo aquele político corrupto que estampa as capas de jornais —, e que, talvez o ponto mais importante: considerar-se honesto não é garantia para que as pessoas deixem de cometer desvios éticos.

A verdade é que, em razão dos pontos cegos éticos e dos mecanismos de racionalização — sem contar com a nossa enorme dificuldade de identificar nossos próprios erros —, nós, os “Muitos” do livro Muitos, sempre poderemos ser a “maçã podre” aos olhos das outras pessoas.

  MITO 3: “Quanto mais controles, melhor”

Temos muita dificuldade de perceber os efeitos colaterais da criação excessiva de controles sobre a motivação das pessoas.

O profissional de Compliance se encontra, muitas vezes, diante de um dilema: por um lado, precisa implementar controles suficientemente rígidos para evitar todo o tipo de desvios; por outro lado, sabe que a implementação desses controles têm impacto negativo sobre o bem-estar e a motivação dos colaboradores. 

Não precisa ser assim.

As Ciências Comportamentais nos mostram que este é um falso dilema. O profissional de Compliance não precisa fazer uma escolha dura entre o “menos pior” dos dois males, mas conciliar o melhor dos dois mundos: criar controles duros o suficiente para dissuadir uma minoria de mal-intencionados, mas de uma maneira que não prejudique a satisfação, nem diminua a motivação da grande maioria das pessoas, que já pretendia, naturalmente, agir de forma correta.

Para entender este ponto, precisamos compreender o porquê de os controles causarem tantos problemas. O primeiro passo é identificarmos que existem diferentes tipos de motivação e entendermos como ocorre a interação entre elas.

As pessoas possuem, portanto, dois tipos de motivação. De maneira geral, podem ficar motivadas para realizar alguma atividade por um tipo de motivação de natureza mais autônoma, que vem “de dentro” — a chamada motivação intrínseca; ou por um tipo de motivação de natureza mais controlada, que vem “de fora” – a chamada motivação extrínseca.

Geralmente, estamos autonomamente (ou intrinsecamente) motivados para realizar atividades que consideramos interessantes ou importantes, como, por exemplo, aprender um novo instrumento — ou agirmos de forma honesta no dia a dia. Isto é, temos a motivação para realizar a ação independentemente da existência de algum incentivo econômico ou reputacional.

Por outro lado, para as atividades que não consideramos interessantes ou relevantes é necessário algo diferente para nos motivar. Nestes casos, precisamos de incentivos extrínsecos, como a previsão de uma multa, de um prêmio ou uma ameaça de punição, para ficarmos — e permanecermos — motivados para realizar a atividade. 

O problema surge quando misturamos os dois tipos de motivação. Isto é, quando adicionamos incentivos extrínsecos (ex.: um controle), para atividades que as pessoas já realizam de forma autônoma, por estarem intrinsecamente motivadas.

Neste caso, de forma intuitiva, podemos pensar que se trata de uma combinação perfeita. Afinal, agora as pessoas têm o dobro de motivação que tinham antes para realizar a atividade: a motivação intrínseca (que sempre tiveram) mais a motivação extrínseca (promovida pelos incentivos externos).

Porém, não é bem assim que ocorre na prática. As evidências das Ciências Comportamentais nos mostram que a adição de incentivos externos pode não só prejudicar a performance das pessoas — fenômeno conhecido pelos economistas como crowding-out da motivação intrínseca —, como também a sua satisfação e o seu bem-estar no médio e longo prazo — fenômeno conhecido por psicólogos como undermining effect. Além do efeito perverso de criar a dependência da performance das pessoas à manutenção dos incentivos.

Por que isso ocorre?

O problema surge porque os dois tipos de motivação não combinam muito bem entre si. Motivação intrínseca e extrínseca, em vez de somarem, ou apenas coexistirem, podem acabar por se anularem mutuamente.

O que podemos observar é que a adição de incentivos externos acaba por corromper a forma como a pessoa percebe a atividade. No caso dos controles de compliance para dissuadir os desvios éticos, o risco é o de que o destinatário do controle comece a perceber as questões ligadas à ética (algo inegociável na sua vida particular por uma questão de princípios) como uma questão de business ou econômica, algo passível de um exame de prós e contras.

Portanto, o desafio do profissional do Compliance, na realidade, não precisa ser na escolha entre mais controles ou mais motivação, mas uma forma de conciliar ambos. Isto é, criar controles rígidos, mas que não gerem tantos efeitos colaterais sobre a motivação e o bem-estar dos seus destinatários.

Dá para fazer! E o caminho passa por ajustar as medidas de controle às chamadas Necessidades Básicas Psicológicas das pessoas por Autonomia, Competência e Conexão. Um papo para um próximo artigo.

*******

[1] No livro Muitos, os autores tratam estes dois tópicos de maneira aprofundada.